“Super Fertile”?

Now that I’ve reached the end of my conventional recurrent miscarriage clinic journey and they’ve tested for everything they could, I’ve more or less come up negative for everything that could cause recurrent pregnancy loss. Our case is now “unexplained.” I guess medically speaking it’s a good thing not to have something wrong with me but strange as it sounds I want something to be identified, something to be wrong with me so it can be treated. I need answers.

The next step in my journey has lead me to a specialist Dr. Q who is so different to the other RMC’s. The primary focus is the lining of the womb. She’s told me I’m a textbook example of someone who is “super fertile.” At last, a possibility, something I can hold on to.

Click here to read about the Super Fertility Study

A normal womb will be selective when approached by fertilised embryos and may even take six months or more to choose the best quality one to implant. Apparently my womb isn’t selective enough and allows any old embryo to implant regardless of its quality or viability. A problem with the lining of the womb will cause this to happen.

The proposed treatment protocol is a course of 400mg progesterone daily started from ovulation for either a week or BFP and to continue if BFP. The good news is that the progesterone will increase the thickness of the lining of the womb which will make good embryos really work at implanting and the bad embryos won’t have a chance. The bad news is that the progesterone will make it harder to get pregnant.

But my main concern at this point is could all five of our fertilised embryos really be that poor quality? They won’t know for sure. If it’s a case of constant chromosomal abnormalities then PGD IVF might help our chances.

But Dr. Q tells me that it might not be that simple. She suspects I might have the presence of high natural killer cells in the womb which will make a nasty environment for fertilised embryos. The cells increase blood vessels and oxygenation which isn’t what you want when fertilising an embryo. Who knew? A simple biopsy will be taken after ovulation to check the levels and if they are higher than normal Prednisolone will be prescribed.

Click here to read about the endometrial natural killer cells study and recurrent miscarriage

So it’s the next piece of the puzzle. The next thing to try out. Keen to get cracking.

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7 thoughts on ““Super Fertile”?

  1. My RE thinks I might be the “super fertile” type, too. He does not believe in NK cells but we are doing IVF with PGS soon, and prednisone is given for a short period… Who know, this might work! I hope this works for you!!

    • It’s interesting stuff. Did you have testing done that made you decide PGS was the way to go? It’s all so confusing. I so hope you get that magic combination and it all works out for you. Best of luck

  2. I’m really interested in this ‘super fertility’ stuff too. My doctor doesn’t buy it, but it certainly fits me (get pregnant very fast, but seem to be problems with most of the embryos). It makes me think its just a matter of waiting for that perfect embryo, but then again, karyotyping came back normal for the two pregnancies we’ve tested. I hadn’t heard of progesterone making it harder to get pregnant. I’ve been on 400 mg prometrium for the last two months and have had two chemical pregnancies, so who knows. Good luck with the new doc!

    • I hope it works out for you too. It all feels so experimental huh? Well I’ll do whatever it takes. Here’s hoping there’s something too this Progesterone thing! Best of luck!

  3. I remember reading about super-fertility after my third miscarriage. It kind of made me feel better. At least it was going wrong in a positive direction, if that makes sense.
    I’ll be following your journey – with a mmc and 3 chemicals in the last year I’m currently undergoing tests for recurrent miscarriage and they said at the outset they were unlikely to find any reason for it. I hope it all works out for you very soon X.

  4. Pingback: OPK – not today | Project Sweet Pea

  5. Pingback: The New Clinic Part 1: The trials and tribulations of the Super Fertile. | Project Sweet Pea

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